The Determiners

Definition: One of a group word which are used at the beginning of a noun group indicating something/someone definitely or indefinitely as well as specially or generally.

Examples:-

I have a book.

She has an umbrella.

I know the man.

The sun shines.

I saw some people in the street.

Types of determiner

There are two types of determiner.

They are-

1. Specific determiner.

2. General determiner.

Specific determiner: When we use determiner to refer to someone or something specially, then it is called specific determiner.

Specific determiners.

The (also called definite article. See article chapter for details.)

Denoting someone or something specially.

Examples:-

The earth moves round the sun.

I knew the man who came here yesterday.

This/ These

We use “This” and “These” to talk about people and things that are close to us in place or time.

We put “This” in front of singular nouns, uncountable nouns, and the singular pronoun “One”. We put “These in front of plural nouns and the plural pronoun “Ones”.

Note: “This”, “that”, “these”, and “those" are often called demonstratives of demonstrative adjectives.

Examples:-

I like this university.

He had a private practice in this flat.

I bought these books for my sister.

I visited these places you have mentioned.

That/Those

When we talk about people or things that are more distant in place of time, we use “that” and “those”.

We put “that” in front of singular nouns, uncountable nouns, and the singular pronoun “ones”.

Examples:-

I knew that woman.

I went that office yesterday, but I didn’t fine him.

Can I have one of those brochures?

Why are those people disputing?

My/your/his/her/its/our/their

These sevens are called possessive determiner.

“My” is the possessive form “I”.

“Your” is the possessive form of “You”.

“His” is the possessive form of “He”.

“Her” is the possessive form of “She”.

“Our” is the possessive form of “We”.

“Their” is the possessive form of “They”.

“It’s” is the possessive form of “It” and used in lieu of opaque material and inferior animals.

General determines

Definition: Determiners that we use in the general sense without saying something/someone specially are called general determiners.

A/an

“A” and an” are called indefinite article .

They also known as indefinite/general determiner.

We use “a” before consonant sound and “an” before vowel sound. (See article for details)

Examples:-

I have a book.

She has a red sari.

Joya bought an umbrella.

This is a university.

He is an honest man.

A few/few/the few

“a few/few/the few” is used before countable nouns.

Examples:-

I have a few friends.

I have few friends.

I have the few books.

A little/little/the little

“A little/little/the little” is used before uncountable nouns.

Examples:-

I drank little milk.

There is a little milk in the glass.

He drank the little milk in the glass.

One/another/other

“One, another and other” are used lieu of both organic or inorganic.

Examples:-

One should do one’s duty.

One thing should remember that “man is mortal”.

If you don’t like this song, you can listen another song and can also listen other songs.

Either/neither

Making choice we use “either and neither”.

You can take either this book or that book.

He ate neither apple nor orange.

Any

“Any” can be used with singular and plural count nouns to talk about one or more people things.

You can take any book.

There are many people in the meeting. Anyone can stool my watch.

Enough/many/more/most/some/several

“Enough, many, more, most, several, and some” are used with plural count nouns to indicate that a number of people of things are being referred to. Each of these determines indicates a different set of group within the total number.

Example:-

She has enough book.

We haven’t enough food.

You are beautiful enough.

Many men make a disruption in the room.

Much/no/all/both/each

“All, both, each, and every” indicate that you are talking about the total number of people or things involved.

“Both” is used with a plural noun.

“All” is used with plural nouns, and “each” and “every” with a singular noun.

“No” is used with singular or plural nouns.

All can go with this boat.

We drink much milk.

There are two teams in the field. Each has eleven players.

Every/each/various

We use “each” when we are thinking about the members as individuals and “every” when we are making a general statement about all of them. “various” we make difference about something or person.

Examples:-

Each applicant has five choices.

I agree with every word Peter says.

We looked at schools in various countries.

Predetermines

Pre-determiner: Pre-determiner is a calls or words which can come in front of a determiner.

All, both, double, half, many, quarter, twice, quite, rather, such, what, which etc.

Examples:-

He will give you all the information.

I shall miss all my friends.

I invited both the boys.

She paid double the sum they asked for.

What a mess!

He has such a beautiful voice.

Post-determine: Post-determiner are determiners which place in a noun group immediately after the determiner, if there is one, and before any other adjectives.

Examples:-

The following brief description.

Certain basic human qualities.

Improvements in the last few years.

Further technological advance.

He wore his usual old white coat.

The only genuine students can to this.

Post-determiners

Additional
Certain
Chief
Entire
Existing
First
Following
Further
Last
Main
Next
Only
Opposite
Other
Particular
Past
Present
Previous
Principal
Remaining
Same
Specific
Ssual etc.

Determiners

A
An
The
My
His
Your
Its
Their
Our
This
That
These
Those
Her
Few
A few
The few
Either
Little
A little
The little
Neither
One
Another
Other
Only
Existing
First
Last
Present
Past
Following
Entire
Remaining
Certain
Particular
Principle
Chief
Main
Same
Further
Previous
Next
Usual
Specific
Various
Opposite
Every
Each
All
No
Numerous
Both
Half
Many
Much
More
Less
Twice
Such
Quite
Most
Enough
Several
Rather
What
Which
Whose
Any
Quarter
All are called determiners.
-Humayun Kabir Joy.